Don’t Risk Missing These 3 Hot Topics from RIMS

RIMS 2018Each year, the Risk Management Society (RIMS) hosts one of the largest industry events. The annual conference and tradeshow brings together thousands of insurance and risk experts, and for the 11th year in a row, the Spring team was among them. We were happy to take a break from Boston’s not-so-springy weather and head to San Antonio for RIMS 2018.

Over the course of the 3-4 days, I was able to a) meet and greet insurance colleagues, both new and familiar, b) party like a true Texan (in case you thought Risk Managers would make for a dull crowd – you may want to rethink this notion), and c) get a gauge on the most popular industry trends and concerns.

For this writeup, I’m focusing on point C, because between various networking and social events, there was a lot to learn at the RIMS annual conference, and I’d love to share some takeaways. Here are the most buzz-worthy topics, in my opinion.

  1. Cyber & Tech

As it has with conferences and news headlines over the past 5-10 years, technology took center stage at RIMS. However, I’m using “technology” as an umbrella term to represent a range of digitally-centric, Internet of Things (IoT) subjects, such as:

a) Cyber

During Berkshire Hathaway, Inc.’s annual shareholders meeting, Warren Buffett Chairman, President and CEO said, “Insurance is very early in the game in determining how to cover the risk of data breaches, ransomware anCyber RIsk Mitigationd other hacking perils”. He then went on to say that the risk itself is a “very material risk” that didn’t exist 15 years ago one that will get worse. The world of cyber threats and attacks continues to keep risk professionals up at night. From my actuarial perspective, the probability and severity of cyber loss events are becoming better understood, although there still is tremendous uncertainty due to the rapidly changing nature of the risk. The following Cyber sessions were presented at RIMS:

  • In “Are You Prepared for a Cyber Extortion Event?”, audiences were walked through different ransomware threats and a checklist for getting through such an attack.
  • Jason Trahan went into further detail in explaining the “Anatomy of a Cyber Event Claim”, which provided a preparation process for cyber claims as well as an extensive list of possible claims expenses.
  • A representative from Willis Towers Watson highlighted the importance of corporate culture when it comes to combating cyber risk.
  • A woman from The Washington Post Risk Management team led a discussion on the different insurance policies that intersect when it comes to cyber risk, and how to manage these overlaps.
  • Jeffrey Sharer of EY revealed some startling statistics such as: “89% say their cybersecurity function does not fully meet their organization’s needs”.
  • Joon Sung and Kevin Kalinich stressed the importance of recognizing and addressing your third party/vendor cyber exposures, nothing that cyber resilience is not just an internal matter.
  • During “Pay Up or Else: Ransomware Risks”, John Coletti and Anna Ziegler explained the latest trends and scams in the ransomware sphere and offered advice on how to be both proactive and reactive.
  • One session focused on communicating a cyber attack to your C-suite, board of directors, and/or other superiors. Ten best practices were shared, such as: “Have a customer notification plan and procedures in place.”

b) Autonomous Vehicles

In March, a self-driving Uber car killed a pedestrian in Arizona, and an autonomous Tesla vehicle caused another death in California. These two incidents are just a couple of many news headlines involving self-driving cars, which certainly pose a variety of risks. As such, they were discussed on several occasions at this year’s conference.

  • In a session entitled, “Driving Insurance Forward”, Katherine J. Henry provided an overview of how autonomous vehicles are covered, the consequences they can bring and ways to confront this emerging risk.
  • Representatives from Liberty Mutual and Ford Motor Company teamed up to explain the different industries that will be affected by the rise in self-driving cars, from oil to advertising companies. Their presentation spoke to the broader trend of disruption in the automotive industry, pointing out 4 facets to consider: autonomous driving, electrification, connectivity, shared mobility/economy.

c) Social Media & Mobile Apps

Considering the recent Facebook privacy scandal, it was important to look at social media and mobile issues from the perspective of risk management and mitigation.

social media risk

  • Gregory Bangs of XL Catlin spoke to the topic of “Social Engineering”, which can incorporate a range of scams such as vendor impersonation and malware. He explained what these fraudulent activities can look like and their implications for insurance coverage and employee preparedness.
  • In “Swipe Right on Insurance”, Cort T. Malone and Stephanie Hyde discussed the risks and insurance options related to social media platforms and mobile apps, as used by employees. They covered things like harassment, privacy, reputation, business torts, intellectual property and the regulatory environment.

d) Wearables

  • Thomas Ryan highlighted the opportunity a “wearable” device poses from a workers’ compensation coverage standpoint and guided the audience on selecting a wearable vendor for corporate use.
  • Two experts from Modjoul Inc. and Cotton Holdings Inc. explained wearables in detail – why use them, how to use them, how they work with insurance carriers, etc. Through a case study, they also endorsed wearables as an option to keep employees safe and productive.

e) Drones & Other Tech Matters

  • Chris Proudlove of Global Aerospace and Vincent Monastersky of Fox Entertainment Group presented the challenges and opportunities associated with the widespread growth of drone use, both commercially and personally. It turns out, over 75% of drone-related claims were caused by operator error. Further, they outlined coverage types and options.
  • A session on emerging technologies, including smart sensors, wearables, drones and artificial intelligence gave audiences a broad but detailed landscape of how all of this connectivity affects the “risk ecosystem”, and tips on drones business riskhow to prepare for the future.
  • Another discussion, led by Tim Yeates, covered the “Fourth Industrial Revolution” and the benefits and risks of the level of information being shared today. Thought-provoking questions like, “Who do we trust – human intelligence or artificial intelligence?” were posed.
  1. Natural Disasters

In 2017, the U.S. was hit hard with Hurricanes Maria, Harvey and Irma as well as wildfires in California. Outside the U.S., the Caribbean was crushed with those same hurricanes, a devastating earthquake hit Mexico, extreme flooding impacted areas like Bangladesh and Sierra Leone, and areas of China suffered from landslides and typhoons. Unfortunately, this is not an exhaustive list.

As risk professionals we need to look at these occurrences from a different lens, so it was no surprise that the word “catastrophe” was rampant at the RIMS 2018 conference.Catastrophic Loss

  • Stephen Moss explained the anatomy of a catastrophe risk model and pointed out the large protection gap, noting that about 50% of the losses incurred from 2017’s most impactful natural disasters were uninsured.
  • An attorney from McCarter & English, LLP focused on business interruption losses resulting from catastrophic loss, discussing pitfalls that could cause your claims to be undermined as well as best practices for getting coverage.
  • Robert Nusslein of Swiss Re explained parametric natural catastrophe insurance for hurricanes and earthquakes, how it differs from traditional insurance and how it can help fill in gaps.
  • In “The Future of Climate Risk Management”, audiences learned about their company’s climate risks – the size, scale, complexity and reach. Then, the speaker introduced solutions and tools for such risks.
  • James Pierce spoke on “Mother Nature’s Onslaught” and speculated on whether a new norm is needed in combatting natural disasters.
  • One session, “The Sky Fell”, went into further detail on catastrophic claims: common claim mistakes, communication issues between layers of insurance, crisis management tactics, TPA management and more.
  • The CEO and Founder of Orbital Insight, a geospatial analytics company, outlined how technologies like satellite and drone imagery as well as AI and cloud computing can provide insight into catastrophic risk assessments. He even showed audiences imagery showing flood detection for Hurricane Harvey, as one of several illustrations.
  1. Compliance

Compliance is always a key concern in this industry. What changes year to year are the specific areas of compliance focus, some of which are below.

  • Lisa Kerr and Bruce Wineman led a session on multinational program compliance – highlighting regulations, tax law, offshoring and variability as things to look out for.
  • A different presentation focused on Medicare and Medicaid compliance, going over the boatload of associated acronyms, lien compliance, reporting and what to look for in a partner.
  • In “Risk Management, Compliance and Preparedness”, attendees received an overview of SRM and ERM, examples of strategic risk, automation advice and more.

 

If you were able to make it to the RIMS conference this year, I hope this helps you retain they event’s key takeaways. If you couldn’t make it to San Antonio, well, now it’s almost as if you were there!

Please feel free to reach out with any questions, actuarial or otherwise. In the meantime, put RIMS 2019 on your calendar – April 28th – May 1st – in Boston (our backyard). We’re already excited for it!

When Was Your Captive’s Last Check-Up?

You’ve had your P&C captive for years and it has continued to perform well throughout. So, what next? How do you capitalize on this success and build on your captive or rebuild an underperforming aspect of it? One word: Refeasibility. Okay, so ‘refeasibility’ isn’t really a word (according to Oxford Dictionary). At least it hasn’t been traditionally, but it is one that needs to be on the tip of the tongue of every captive owner. It is a word that has become somewhat synonymous with captive optimization and very accurately describes what captive owners need to do with an older captive: conduct a new (re)feasibility study.

The Importance of Refeasibility

As with all other business matters, your company’s captive needs and goals are likely to change over time, especially with new and emerging risks sprouting up frequently. Much like your family car, a captive should have a check up on a periodic basis. As a captive matures and companies evolve, captives need to be re-examined to determine if changes should be made to align with current organisational needs. Key reasons for this re-examination include the following:

  • Positive or negative experience
    • Example: unexpected adverse loss experience, such as supply chain interruption, resulting in business income loss not covered by insurance
  • Surplus release or addition
    • Example: surplus growth for the captive has been good and, as a result, there is now opportunity to add/expand coverages insured in the captive
  • Opportunities to add new lines of coverage (that perhaps didn’t exist or weren’t relevant before)
    • Example: Employee benefits or cyber risk
  • Change in the risk profile of various risks
    • Example: Litigiousness is on the rise in the insured’s industry and additional protection is needed
  • Changes in the regulatory environment
    • Generally speaking, regulatory changes have impacted business directly or indirectly, resulting in loss of revenue. This is a leading concern for small business owners.
  • Changes in law (such as those resulting from case law outcomes like the recent Commissioner vs. Avrahami case)

To address all these potential changes, our Spring CARE (Captive Analytical Risk Evaluation) team recommends a captive evaluate its risk appetite and risk exposure at least every ? ve years. Are you still writing the right lines in your captive? Are you still in the right domicile? Would a different structure be more profitable? Would other service providers make a difference? Have your claims changed signi?cantly? Have regulations changed over the years? All this and more can be answered with a good review of your captive by a professional consultant.

Captive optimisation starts with a captive refeasibility study. Every refeasibility study is different to varying degrees; the scope and resources required to conduct the study are dependent on the captive’s current structure, the events (if any) that triggered the study and the goals of the company. That said, through our Spring CARE system, we follow a carefully-constructed evaluation structure when our team works through the process of evaluating captive client’s existing captive. Generally speaking, we follow and recommend the following ? ow process in conducting a refeasabiity study, starting with goals and ending with measurement.

Goals StageRisk Transfer Vehicles

In this initial stage, it is important to focus on con? rming the goals and objectives of your captive, both new and old. Have the older goals been achieved? How have the goals changed over the years? This is a critical step in laying the groundwork and direction of your refeasibility project. Also critical at this early point is the collection of data. We consider the data to be collected here as not only the stats and facts of the captive, but also the more subjective (non-paper) data that can be gleaned through management interviews and informal stakeholder surveys. Finally, in any good refeasibility study, it is very important to identify changes in your risk pro?le. The risk matrix to the right shows the four classic actions a company can use to handle each of their risks (DeLoach 2000).

Typically,  high probability or high impact risks should be considered for insuring in your captive. Some of the most common risks to insure in captives are listed below . Emerging risks should also be considering in this assessment. For example, A new technology like driverless cars will create both risk and/or opportunities across various industries.

Coverages commonly written into captives:

Employee Benefits Risks Property & Casualty Risks
AD&D Auto Liability
Life/Loss of Key Employee Business Interruption
Long-Term Disability Directors & Officers Liability
Medical Stop-Loss General Liability
Voluntary Benefits Professional Liability
Retiree Benefits Property (deductible or excess layer)
Pension Buy-Outs/Buy-Ins Trade Credit
Workers’ Compensation
Commercial Policy Excluded Risk

 

Impact Stage

You want to be sure you have a clear idea of what you’re looking to accomplish, and to what extent. The Impact Stage of a refeasibility study involves looking at all the different pieces of tCaptive Optimizationhe captive puzzle to determine how they would be affected by the changes you’re considering. A few activities that a professional captive optimizer would look to accomplish in this phase would be:

  • Conducting an analysis of your risk financing optimization
  • Reviewing your current reinsurance levels and optimizing your reinsurance use
  • Stress testing of the captive with reasonable adverse case outcomes

Strategies Stage

It’s important to outline the methods you plan on utilizing in your captive refresh; in this Strategies Phase, a professional captive optimizer would ?rst analyse any additional lines of coverage that could be insured by your captive.

Secondly, a surplus management strategy would be developed. There are various considerations in appropriately managing the capital and surplus levels over the life of a captive, including average cost of capital, retention levels, reinsurance use, taxes and a number of others that a team of actuaries and consultants would review and develop strategy to address.

Structure Stage

Now that you know what you want to do and how, it’s time to take a closer look at how it will all work together in a logical structure. Market changes should give you some food for thought. For example, pure captives are increasingly changing to sponsored entities. In this Structure Stage, it is important to identify investment management best practices as well as the optimal collateral structure.

Measurement

Finally, all sound captive projects end with measurement. This is the time to collect new data and determine to what extent goals were met, and impacts made. A great deal of this stage relieCaptive Refeasibility s on the creation of solid industry benchmarks to measure current and future captive performance against. It is also important in the Measurement Stage for the optimization team to develop implementation plans based on their findings and make actionable recommendations for helping you achieve the goals that were established in the first phase of this project. At the conclusion of the measurement phase, a professional captive optimization team, such as our Spring CARE team, would produce a refeasibility report for your captive. In this report, all of the ?ndings of the refeasibility study are outlined and reviews along with the recommendations developed in this phase. These ?ndings can serve as a base line for measurement.

Conclusion

Regardless of how old or new your captive is, there are a number of internal and external factors that have changed since it was created. With all the changes taking place in the industry, it is a great time to have a professional come in and not only take a snapshot of how your captive is currently performing, but also help you project and strategize where your captive should be in the future. Now is a great time for a captive refeasibility study.