As seen in the Captive Review Group Captive Report, September 2021.

With the rapid spread of the Delta variant, the Covid-19 pandemic continues to leave employers with a series of unpredictable risks directly related to the pandemic. Among these risks is the potential higher cost of healthcare benefits offered to employees, a factor which must be built into any long-term risk management or cost-containment strategy. Covid-19’s impact on healthcare costs Based on tracking data across multiple employers, the future impact of Covid-19 on high cost claims will directly impact health insurance. Key factors include:Healthcare cost management

  • Direct costs related to Covid-19: Costs associated with testing, treatment and vaccines remain a primary source of plan costs. The most direct impact on captives is the high cost treatment tied to severe hospitalizations, particularly due to potent strains of Covid-19 like the Delta variant. There may also be ongoing health needs for members who recover from Covid-19 or are long-haulers.
  • Deferral of care: Plan members have chosen to defer elective treatments. While some of this care was eventually incurred over the course of the last year, many plan members continue to hold back on care, whether because of discomfort in a hospital setting or difficulty in finding care due to bandwidth issues. This influences future costs, particularly with unpredictable costly surgeries.
  • Missed preventative care: Client data across industries also showed a significant reduction in preventative care visits, and lower test numbers in areas such as labs, CT scans and MRIs. As a result, many employers are concerned because if certain health issues are not identified and treated early, the severity of the case and corresponding cost of care may be higher down the road.
  • Behavioral health: Covid-19 propelled behavioral health issues into crisis levels. While it may seem indirectly related to broader healthcare, consider this: the national Alliance on Mental Illness reports that cardiometabolic disease rates are twice as high in adults with serious mental illness, and that depression and anxiety disorders cost the global economy $1 trillion annually in lost productivity. We are sure to see the repercussions of this in claims costs to come.

Health insurer risk premium margins built into insurance pricing have been increasing in light of all this uncertainty, as well as broader trends such increased prevalence of high cost specialty drugs and increasing hospital costs. In fact, the most prevalent specialty medications are increasing in price at 10%-15% annually, further contributing to unpredictability of future claims.

Employer Considerations

During the pandemic, employers have needed to confront their organizational philosophy on the employee value proposition and balancing the investment in employee benefits with the impact on the company’s stakeholders. The impact of Covid-19 has made employers more acutely aware of the need for sufficient healthcare coverage for employees and their families.

In order to provide attractive benefits in an environment of rising costs and volatility, employers must rethink the programs they offer and how they are funded. Many organizations have also revisited benefit program governance structures, how decisions are made, and how programs are monitored.

Perhaps your remote workforce has different needs than they did in 2019, or the pandemic has triggered new problem areas that can be addressed through wellness solutions or advocacy tools.

No matter your path, employers seeking to ensure that they offer comprehensive healthcare benefits to employees at an affordable cost need to consider the financial management benefit of potential long-term cost savings and mitigation of volatility associated with captive structures.

Captive Arrangements for Employee Benefits

As employers look at the impact of the pandemic, organizational planning requires balancing the increasing cost of healthcare with the risk associated with solutions that reduce the total cost of the program. At its simplest form, health insurance can be expensive if a fully insured program is purchased, as organizations pay a risk margin, often 20% to 40%, for transfer of the risk to an insurer. Small to mid-sized organizations typically mitigate this cost by self-insuring a portion of their healthcare risk with medical stop-loss to cover higher cost claims. However, the higher risk premiums required by health insurance, including stop-loss insurance, lead to steep healthcare plan costs and/or, in some cases, being forced to take on higher-than-optimal risk.

A captive arrangement is a strategic way for employers to benefit from self-insurance while creating a sustainable solution to partner with commercial markets. Captives provide substantial competitive advantages over traditional self-insurance, such as:captive insurance

  • Reduced total cost of insurance: Insurance carriers develop premiums by heavily weighing on industry averages, state rates and, to some degree, on an employer’s individual loss experience. This may lead to pricing that may not accurately reflect an organization’s actual loss experience. Insurance carriers usually price to include substantial overheads, including risk and profit margins. A captive provides employers an opportunity to recapture premiums from the commercial market and build a sustainable long-term model for their insurance needs.
  • Insulation from market fluctuations: Conventional commercial insurance is vulnerable to market fluctuations. This has never been more evident than today, with hard insurance markets and premiums that are increasing substantially with almost no change in coverage level. As a member in a captive program, employers are less susceptible to unpredictable rising costs imposed by conventional insurers every renewal season, as a balanced funding approach can smooth the cyclical volatility of the commercial insurance markets.
  • Protection from cashflow volatility: Leveraging a captive to fund medical stop loss can lower the cashflow volatility often faced by self-insured programs on a monthly basis. Having a captive cover claims at a substantially lower stop-loss level allows employers to smooth out plan funding and mitigate cashflow risk to the company.

For employers that may not have their own captive or the resources to form one, there are a variety of group captive solutions in the medical stop-loss space. These solutions are turnkey in nature and simple to implement. Most well-structured group captive programs aim for a seamless transition for employers where there is almost no disruption. In other words, from an employee’s perspective, the claims process is entirely the same. With group captives in particular, all the mechanical aspects are handled by the group captive management team, with minimal effort required for an employer.

There are several group captive arrangements that employers can tap into. In selecting the most appropriate arrangement, you need to consider factors such as the upfront cost of the program, the extent to which customization will be available, the flexibility you will have for your organization within the group captive model, and how renewals will work.

Looking Beyond the Pandemic

As we look forward beyond the pandemic, employers should consider ongoing healthcare program effectiveness. Healthcare costs will continue to increase and become a larger portion of organizational budgets, but it is not too late to start leveraging innovative solutions to mitigate these costs. You can proactively adjust your tactics today and be better prepared for tomorrow, and with a captive you are truly in the driver’s seat.

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Prabal Lakhanpal

Prabal Lakhanpal

Prabal is a Senior Consultant with Spring and leads technical and management support in the areas of employer-sponsored and voluntary employee benefits, product development, technology solutions and captive insurance. Prabal joined Spring in 2015 as a graduate from Babson College, where he graduated with a master’s degree in Business Administration. Prior to joining Spring, Prabal worked as a consultant and advisor to clients in various industries and sectors.